American History & Institutions



Knowledge of American History and the principles of American Institutions under the federal and state constitutions is required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree.


You may satisfy the American History and Institutions requirement in one of the following ways:
  • By having passed with a grade of C or better one high school unit in American history, or one-half high school unit in American history and one-half high school unit in civics or American government.
  • By completing with a grade of P or C– or better any one-quarter course of instruction accepted as satisfactory by the Committee on Educational Policy and Courses. Any of the following courses are suitable for fulfilling the requirement:
    • HILD 2A-B-C, HILD 7A-B-C, or any course listed under HIUS (other than HIUS Colloquia)
    • Political Science 10, 100A, 100B, 100C, 102C, 102H, 104A, 110EA-EB, 110J, 142A
    • Ethnic Studies 112A-B, 125, 130, 131, 149, 167, 170A-B.
  • By presenting proof of having received a score of 550 or more on the SAT II Subject Test of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) in American History.
  • By submitting a score of 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement Test in American History or American Government and Politics.
  • By presenting proof of having satisfied the present requirement as administered at another collegiate institution within the state.
  • By successful completion of a one-quarter or one-semester course, with a grade of C or better, in either American history or American government at a community college within the state.
  • By successful completion of a one-quarter or one-semester course, with a grade of C or better, in either American history or American government at a recognized institution of higher education, community colleges included, in another state.

An international student attending the university on an F-1 or J-1 visa, by showing proof of temporary residence in the United States, may petition for exemption from this requirement through the office of his or her college provost during the senior year.